There’s Always Something!

It’s wonderful on a mild sunny autumn morning to have a walk around the garden and see the summer flowering plants have their last little fling before going to sleep for the winter. Apart from my days off mornings are the only times I get in the garden now that it’s autumn.

My red hot poker plant, Kniphofia rooperi is still in flower and has two large bright yellow-orange rounded torch-like flower heads, I can see why it has the R.H.S. Award of Garden Merit, it’s such a good strong grower and performer. There are five different varieties of clematis, each with a single flower left; they’ve all looked really good this year. Clematis ‘Henyri’ has been glorious spreading over the ivy and appearing to climb up the lower trunks of the popular trees.

The climber Fatshedera x lizei clearly enjoyed the rain earlier in the year and has never looked so good. It doesn’t cling by itself, but needs tying and training up the fence. Its leaves and flowers are similar to Fatsia japonica, the False Castor Oil plant and it’s still in flower.

Those autumn crocuses that I planted late August have flowered well and are keeling over.

The little happy faces of winter pansies cheer up the edges of a new path that I laid earlier in the year. The vibrant, colourful juicy berries of the cotoneasters, hollies and pyracanthas will keep the birds happy and well fed during those cold winter months giving them little happy chirpy faces too.

Viburnum x bodnantense ‘Dawn’ is a lovely deciduous winter flowering shrub in the middle area of the garden, its wonderful fragrance should drift through the garden and also has the R.H.S. Award of Garden Merit.

I’ve finished most of the tasks that I mentioned the other week, but as always just when I think I’m nearly done a few more jump onto the band wagon like tidying up my rambling rose or it will be rambling in my neighbour’s garden. My apple and pear trees will need pruning next month, and all my fruit trees will need a winter wash to kill off any little critters that have a mind to over winter in them.

That’s the thing about gardening, the more you garden the more work you make and find. It’s great isn’t it?