Fruit Trees

The approach and subsequent arrival of Winter is the time that Nurserymen turn their attention to trees. The range of ornamental and fruit trees is vast and so we face an interesting challenge trying to second guess the expectations of our customers, however it is important that we supply many of the tried and tested varieties that have been around for many years.

I will deal with ornamental trees in another issue but for now aim to concentrate on the fruit trees that Silica Lodge Garden Centre are offering this year.

We carry a broad range of Eating Apple varieties which will include; Cox’s Pippin, Braeburn, Scrumptious, James Grieve, Laxtons Superb, Katy, Gala, Egremont Russet and many more.

We supply all these varieties on a dwarfing rootstock called an M27 which means that the tree won’t grow much higher than a couple of metres and therefore picking your fruit will be easy.

It is useful to know that Apple trees belong to a pollination group based on its flowering time and the pollination group will have a number so let’s say for example that you buy a Katy, which is in group 3 then your pollinating partner will need to be group 2, 3, or4. It’s that simple. Mind you, if you are planting in a suburban area with plenty of neighbours it is likely that your tree will be pollinated from others locally anyway. Furthermore, if you only want to put one eating apple in your garden there are many types of crab apple that will provide the necessary pollination as well as having beautiful flowers.

For the apple pie lovers (and let’s face it, who isn’t) we have Bramley Seedling and Bramley 20 on the M27 rootstock. Bramley 20 is just a slightly less vigorous version but still capable of providing plenty of fruit. It is worth adding that Bramleys will not pollinate other varieties.

Our Pear selection includes Conference, Williams Bon Chretin, Beurre Hardy, Doyonne du Comice, Concorde and a few others. They are usually available on the Quince A or Quince C rootstock which will allow growth to about 4 metres and 3 metres respectively. Pollination in a suburban garden will probably be provided by neighbourhood trees but if not, a pollination partner in the same or adjacent group will do the job.

I always recommend the planting of fruit trees in any Garden, as the simple joy of watching the gorgeous flowers being attended by the busy bees and other visitors and then to watch the embryonic fruit develop into the tasty treat that you can enjoy fresh from the tree is just one of nature’s finest experiences.

We also have a broad range of Plums, Gages, Quinces, Nuts etc…. So why not pop down and have a look.

We are always happy to see you!

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